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A holistic approach to a healthier community.

Mosaic Life Care is a physician-led healthcare system offering primary, specialty and urgent care. The Mosaic Life Care concept was born out of Heartland Health in St. Joseph, Missouri and cares for both the patient's health and life. In addition to primary and specialty care, Mosaic also offers life coaching. Through specially trained Life Coaches, patients can create Life Plans that empower them to better deal with a variety of life issues that can affect their health. The Life Coaches also help patients define life goals and implement strategies to achieve them.

Mark Laney, MD

President and CEO

Heartland Health / Mosaic Life Care

Mark Laney, MD, joined Heartland Health in 2009 as the president and CEO. Prior to Heartland, Dr. Laney served for 15 years at Cook Children's Health Care System as the Cook Children's Physician Network president.

Dr. Laney earned a Bachelor of Arts from the University of North Texas in Denton, Texas, received a Doctor of Medicine from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, Texas and completed a Pediatric Neurology Fellowship at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. In 2000, he received a Master of Science in medical management at the University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Texas Southwestern in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Laney is the President of the Mayo Clinic Alumni Association and is one of the 30 Best Physician Leaders of Hospitals and Health Systems according to Becker's Hospital Review.

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Q:

How did Mosaic Life Care start its population health model?

A:

Heartland Health - from which Mosaic Life Care was born - started this journey about 12 or 13 years ago by joining the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program, which helped us focus on reducing costs and improving outcomes. Coming out of that program, we went through a six-year process to incorporate an elaborate electronic medical record system, allowing us to look at the whole spectrum of care. Building this infrastructure created efficiencies that allow us to work in the best interest of the patient - a necessary first step in developing population health practices.

Q:

What is the biggest barrier to adopting population health management practices in general?

A:

The current reimbursement system. The fee-for-service model doesn't allow a system to build the infrastructure to be proactive and introspective, which is what population health is all about. But if you move to adopt population health management too quickly, that could lead to financial trouble. Having to live and work in two separate worlds as you make that transition is a real tightrope act.

Q:

How would you suggest getting started with population health?

A:

Quality and safety are important standards that any organization must be doing well before adopting population health management models. They are the building blocks and a result of refined processes and structure. In addition, an organization must be able to share data and information through a robust IT system, working in the best interest of the patient. You must be high performing and successful with your operations before you start tackling this new model.

Q:

You were an early adopter of the ACO (accountable care organization) concept. What do you see today with ACOs that you didn't see two or three years ago?

A:

We've been subscribers to the Medicare ACO product for over a year. Our shared savings model has allowed us to be more flexible with providing the right care in the right place. Take for example our Hospital at Home program we're piloting right now. If a patient needs an IV for 10 days, we can send a nurse to the person's home twice a day to give the patient the antibiotic. Average inpatient volume has decreased by 12-15 patients per day. Overall, early numbers look good and we're excited about what we're seeing and are continuing to learn.

Q:

What are some of the lessons you've learned through creating Mosaic Life Care and approaching healthcare as Life Care?

A:

Mosaic Life Care has evolved into something far more than I initially thought. When we first started down the path to create Mosaic, I thought it would be only about improving the patient experience. But it has become more than that.

We've learned that about five percent of the population drives 50 percent of our costs. We're identifying those individuals and proactively helping them. We believe that if you come to the hospital, that's a failure on our part. All of the things that used to be considered good measurements should now be considered opportunities for improvement for the future. We can no longer provide the same healthcare model and expect a different outcome.

As a more experienced physician, you begin to appreciate the effect of a person's lifestyle on their health - things that traditional healthcare has never considered in the service offering. Yet all of those things - work, relationships, lifestyle - affect one's health and happiness.

Q:

As CEO, what's your role in population health management?

A:

I see myself primarily as the Chief Culture Officer - laying out our vision and creating an atmosphere that promotes the work we do and how we go about it. When making a commitment to quality, it starts at the top of the organization. Our caregivers look to the CEO to make it happen and communicate to the entire organization.